Passchendaele

My Great uncle was 35 when he was killed in action at Passchendaele, Belgium on October 12, 1917. Europe was at war since 1914 and in Russia the revolution was to explode in a few days.

Duncan had enlisted in AIF in November 1916 and sailed to England to get some basic training before arriving in Calais and being sent to the front.

Seeing the headstone of his grave with his name simply inscribed D.McCallum was deeply and profoundly sad. So far from home in Sydney

It was was a sunny afternoon when I saw the headstone in a cemetery surrounded by corn fields. The corn had been cut and the stubble retained in the earth. In the distance were farms and further away the villiage of Zonnebeke, further still Passendale.

Duncan’s 36th Battalion’s mission was to take Passchendaele from the Germans. On October 12 it was unsuccessful. Thousands of Australians died in that poorly planned battle in the driving rain and waist deep in the Belgium mud.

I don’t know what killed Duncan, a bullet, a bomb or bayonet. It will never be known. But what is certain is the order from Field Marshall Haig to attack when the officers on the battle ground knew it was hopeless, given the weather led to the deaths of thousands that morning.

Duncan is my link to the Great War who did not return home. Unlike my grandfather Alex Gibson and other great uncles, Bill Gibson, Jack Gray and Gerald Boés who married aunty Gloria. Duncan never saw his two little girls grow up, or watched a rubgy league game or saw his brother Don again.

So somewhere between the jumping off point and his grave in the small Dochy Farm New British Cemetery he was wounded and died on the shoulders of the Australian stretcher bearers.

Visiting the area today is vastly different to that place which in the weeks before October 12 had been pounded with over 4 million exposives that punctured the water table and turned the land to a quagmire.

Today the farms are back growing corn, leeks, cabbages and brussel sprouts. Children ride their bikes to the village school on the country lanes and roads.

There is a B&B called Varlet Farm where they have a small muesem and Charlotte shares kindness and smothers you in food and comfort. She knows the places where the troops were, what happened to who and where they maybe buried.

Every year 20 tonnes of WW1 munitions are found on the fields of Flanders. There are no winners in WAR we’re all losers.

https://icecapade09.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=159

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s